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Marines Get Carded

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USMC Cpl. Matthew Manning

All Marines in the Pacific will be issued cards reminding them of values the Corps expects them to uphold.

TOKYO – The Marines have tried curfews, drinking restrictions and plain old jawboning to cut down crime and controversy on Okinawa, a key center of U.S. military power in the Pacific. Now they’re handing out reminder cards.

The more than 20,000 Marines stationed in the Pacific region will get wallet-sized cards that promote core values of “honor, courage and commitment,” and remind Marines of the battles fought and price paid by earlier generations.

“We are forward-deployed in the region, and we call this place home,” says Lieut. General Kenneth Glueck, commander of the Okinawa-based III Marine Expeditionary Force. The card “serves as a constant reminder of our heritage, our traditions and the ideals that have made the corps what it is today.”

Glueck went on a speaking tour of bases last year after a series of crimes by U.S. servicemen on Okinawa sparked large-scale protests and led to curfews and restrictions on alcohol consumption for Marines and other U.S. forces. The Marines’ V-22 Osprey also has been the target of protests over noise and safety concerns.

The card includes the names of battles and campaigns fought by Marines in the Asia-Pacific region. It also has a compass rose intended to remind leathernecks to align their values with “True North.” No word on whether a GPS is next.

31 comments
HypatiaLeigh1
HypatiaLeigh1 like.author.displayName 1 Like

Pathetic.   Pitiful.   Morons needing a PR coverup because they have zero strength/smarts to have basic respect for selves & others.    

Our current military is a HUGE waste of our monies.

manlyman
manlyman

As a father of a fine young man who happens to be a marine, let me state here and now that you are a true waste of oxygen!

shaysite
shaysite

It's true that Marines deployed in the pacific before 1960 never committed crimes whether under the influence of alcohol or sober. Brigs and courts martial did not exist for Marines during that era. And more broadly speaking, problems with military service personnel committing crimes-in particular sexual crimes-is a relatively new phenomena which has only appeared in the last couple of decades. In the millennia of recorded history before, they were unheard of. So the problems we see today are evidence of declining values.

SavannahJohnston
SavannahJohnston

@shaysite Citation needed. Just because something used to be unheard of doesn't necessarily mean it wasn't happening, and there's no such thing as "no one in group X *ever* committed crimes before this date". You don't and can't possibly know that, unless each and every one of those Marines was constantly under video surveillance, which I highly doubt since we're talking about pre-60s. And if it's true that brigs and courts martial didn't exist back then, I would think that if anything there would have been a *greater* amounts of crime.

wadased
wadased

How much did it cost to print these cards? In a time when the Marines and other Naval personal are being forced with equipment and weapon cut back. I was in the Navy , but my son did 37 years in the Corp. He does not need a card. He knew that when joined and never forgot it.

DonaldBlack
DonaldBlack

Oh cool they can whip that out and read it to the school girl they are about to rape.

Historybuff
Historybuff

Served in the Marines back in the late 60's... I grew up there.   I hope the moral disintegration currently happening in American society does not contaminate the Marine Corps.

Someday... we are going to NEED strong, moral, dedicated, men & women to win battles & wars.   Under obama/pelosi/reid... this may happen sooner rather than later.

HB

 

RicardoMontoya
RicardoMontoya like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 3 Like

I never realized the value of being a Marine until years after my service (Vietnam Veteran). After struggling with alcohol abuse, broken marriage, homelessness and jail, I turned into a rehabilitation center for help and was force to talk about being a Marine.About Pride, remembering how I felt on graduation date in San Diego in 1971, especially after having spent two weeks in Moto (Motivation Platoon).About Honor, how good it felt STANDING AT ATTENTION when the National Anthem and Marine Corps Hymn is played and the American Flag is marched by.About Integrity, making sure my appearance and behavior represented the platoon’s integrity and about Courage, making the choices and risk to insure the platoon’s objectives. But, most of all was the discipline (self) I’d had to learn and experience, “the hard way” and very grateful to this day for it had lifted me throughout my twenty years of sobriety.I feel today that the value card (principles) are the strenght to my being.

Just the other day while attending an outdoor concert in my Marine Corps t-shirt a stranger walked up to me and said, “You represent the Marine Corps very well”.

Semper Fi, Marines

BruceJenkins
BruceJenkins

I did my 4 years in the corps in the early 2000's and the last part of which was in Okinawa,  there were plenty of protests then and there will always be protests,  but let us not forget the more then 3000 lost at Pearl Harbor, and the more than 100,000 lost in the pacific,  if they didn't want us there,  they should have won the war. 

MayaS
MayaS

@BruceJenkins 

If lives lost during the war entitled people to do things like rape others, the US would not want to be stationed in Okinawa. More Okinawan CIVILIANS died during the Battle of Okinawa than US in the Pacific. Do you think they wanted the war? I really wish they would educate people like you on history before stationing you in other countries. 

johnwayneflower
johnwayneflower like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

@BruceJenkins 

Read some history before you spew forth your venom. Also if you spent some time in Oki you know they are Okinawans and not Japanese, How kind of Japan to let Americans occupy 60% of that little island, while mainland Japan has allocated less than 10% for American forces there. You would protest also if another country occupied your home town and did what the armed forces are doing to the locals on the Island.

Sure the U.S. won the war, but I bet you think the Japanese were the first to declare war on America. Read some history and I will give you a hint. Oil.

You are the typical ugly American who believes just because the U.S. won the war they should look down on the Okinawans and the Japanese. I saw so many of you ignorant shmucks on the island, made me ashamed to be an American. Loud, Drunk, breaking all the vending machines on the streets. Busting beer bottles all over the sea walls. Rapping girls. committing murder. I was there, I saw it with my own eyes. I could write books on what stupid Marines did on that little island.

It got worse after 1995 and all you little Nintendo playing boys were introduced to the rest of the world.

Those Okinawans never bother anyone. The island is beautiful, the water clean and pristine. The beaches spotless. In mainland Japan a woman could walk home at 3:00am in the morning without fear of being attacked and that's in Tokyo! Probably the safest city in the world.

You my fellow Jar head learned nothing. You were taught Honor, Respect, Discipline and Integrity and to paraphrase Jack Nicolson "Some of you Marines use them as a punching bag" The biggest lesson you should have learned is respect.

I never had any issues in any country I was deployed to. I was respectful and in turn they were respectful to me. It's called quiet discipline, understanding and most of all mutual respect.

If you are married I sure hope both you and your wife have mutual respect for each other.

WollfBenghaziHowlsatmoon
WollfBenghaziHowlsatmoon

I smiled at the last rwo lines on the card,"I am a warrior prepared for todays crisis and ready to fight tonight" But, that goes without saying. :)

GSC
GSC like.author.displayName 1 Like

Ten years in the Air Force and I never needed nor saw any card that had to be carried in order to remind me of my duty. I knew what it was every morning when I woke up, whether I put on the uniform or not.  However, while visiting friends at Camp LaJuene I did  have to remind a Marine about respect.  He basically felt that nobody deserved to walk on the same ground as a Marine. What a shame that such an honored tradition has become so belligerent and now violent.

Looking at the card and reading the article I see that the battles listed on the card are supposed to be Asia-Pacific.  Since when is Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm an Asia-Pacific campaign?

GregoryRush
GregoryRush like.author.displayName 1 Like

@GSC Because they took place in Southwest Asia.  And FYI, we've always been belligerent and violent.  It's part of our charm.

KennethDugan
KennethDugan

This will never work. I was on this base and let me tell you the problem is not young men and women that serve. It is the culture in the Marine Corp. that promotes higher ranking members to mentally abuse and torment junior enlisted personnel. Marines are treated terribly by their superiors. Then when they lash out, the crack down on them harder, not giving our young men and women any real respect. This card is just another reminder that shows how much the Marine Corp. actually cares. Only enough to make them print a card and say behave, but not enough to actually do any real change. They treat the junior enlisted with such disrespect, no wonder there is a high suicide rate. 

johnwayneflower
johnwayneflower

@KennethDugan 

I also did not see that, sure there was the occasional ragging on someone, but not to the point of abuse.

Historybuff
Historybuff

@KennethDugan  

I was in the Marines in the late 60's, discharged in 1971.   This was perhaps the low water mark for ALL the branches of the US military, due to the un-popularity of the Vietnam war.   The American democratic party routinely trashed the military.

But at no time did I ever see the conduct you state.   Firm Leadership? Yes.   Accountability? Yes.   Did see some questionable conduct... but as you will remember from Bootcamp... "There is ALWAYS that 10% that will screw up...".

HB  

GregoryRush
GregoryRush like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

@KennethDugan  Not sure which Marine Corps you were in, but I was in from '91 to '02 and didn't see officers treat junior enlisted in the way you described (FYI, I started as a private and got out as a Captain).  Actually the worst CO I remember was actually a Navy Captain, not a Marine, and he treated his SNCO's and JO's like garbage.  Regardless of that, I spent 3 years on Okinawa, and the problem is not a culture of disrespect or hazing or anything else, it's a bunch of 18-20 year olds away from home for the first time, they don't speak the language and they frequently don't avail themselves of all the opportunities that Okinawa has to offer.  The ones that are not put off by the culture and get out and interact with the locals usually have a good time, but the ones that for whatever reason choose not to besides hitting the bars that sit 100 ft. outside the front gate of nearly every base, they are the ones that become the problem.  They are lonely, full of testosterone, lacking in wisdom and experience, and frequently end up drinking their spare time away instead of doing anything constructive.  During my time there I saw more absurd attempts by the command structure, all the way up to the commandant, to try and curtail the drunken off base behavior. What worked for me was taking an interest in my Marines and Sailors, knowing what was going on back home and in their personal lives, and encouraging them to do productive things with their time, wether it was scuba diving or finishing their degree while they were there, or whatever.  Perhaps there is still a leadership gap in some units, but I had the the Marine and Sailor of the Quarter every time while I was there, so I think I'm proof that a leader that cares about those in his/her charge can make a difference.  Sorry you didn't like your experience in the Corps, but I hardly think your view is one that would be shared by many, at least not the Marines and Sailors I know. 

KennethDugan
KennethDugan

@GregoryRush @Historybuff @KennethDugan I understand and sympathize. However this was happening in 2003. From the sound of it, nothing has changed. It seems the Marine Corp. has grown stagnant. The only constant in the universe is change and if nothing changes then nothing will ever get better. I firmly believe if you are not getting better you are getting worse. There is always room for improvement. Though I admire and respect tradition, this is not about pomp and circumstance. A plastic card that reminds Marines that others have died does not even touch the core of the problem. This is a new modern world with modern young men and women entering a military system. Marines already get the short end of the stick with already getting the Navy's hand me downs. Mandatory fun days, and plastic cards are not what the marines need. They need to reevaluate themselves and their culture. To reestablish the idea of family and inheritance. To treat each other with total respect, and not just another pawn that can be replaced. I believe every marine matters. Even the ones with problems. A little empathy can go a long way. Trying to make everyone look and act the same, though uniform, ignores the talents and possibilities an individual can provide to such an organization. It's a complete shame that it has come down to this. I do hope that the Corp. will learn from it's mistakes and not just do the same thing, day after day, year after year, and expect that to make the Junior Marines behave themselves. It's insanity to think otherwise. 

RB
RB like.author.displayName 1 Like

I'm actually amazed this is a news story. I did four and a half years in the Army not too terribly long ago, and I was required to have the following cards on me at all times:

1) Battle Buddy card. It was a card that had the name and phone number of my "battle buddy" in case I was in a jam. And I guess lost my cellphone and had to use a  payphone at the jail or something? I don't know.

2) ACE card. ACE stands for: Ask, Care, Escort. Ask someone if they want to kill themselves, care if they do express a desire to do so, and then escort them to the nearest mental health professional. I guess the Army figured once I shoved that card somewhere in my wallet I'd never see it again that I'd never forget to Ask, Care, and Escort.

3) Army Values card. I'm not going to go over the Army values because it's ridiculously long and unnecessary. Let's just say that carrying this card didn't help most people follow these values.

The cards are the invention of some very, very, very bored staff officers. Like most efforts the military undertakes it is pointless in the extreme and designed to allow commanders to cover their butts. "Oh, he beat his wife? WHY? I GAVE HIM A CARD! GOSH, SOME PEOPLE!" Honestly you could probably have a news website dedicated solely to Catch-22ish stuff like this. Semper Fidelis Devil Dogs, keep your cards close to your hearts and stay strong.

RichardSessoms
RichardSessoms

@RB I did 8 years in the Marines and got out in 2009. We had to have the Marine Corps Values cards on us at all times. It was even included for uniform inspections, in the left breast pocket. Hell when I was deployed on ship and we did port calls they gave us even more cards for specific ports with numbers to call in case of trouble. This is just another check in box answer done by some Officer has no freaking clue or leadership. 

mevans490
mevans490 like.author.displayName 1 Like

The Marines need to practice what they preach and take of their Marines instead of perpetuating the racism within their ranks.  TAKE CARE OF MARINES FOR REAL.  If only American public knew what really goes on in the Marines, it is sad and appalling.

truthbetold1226
truthbetold1226

@mevans490 , thank you. I just replied that I served in the Marines 1956 to 1960.. I am black. Need I say more?

Historybuff
Historybuff

@mevans490  

Too many ex-marines out there for you to pull this one.   I/we KNOW what goes on... 

It is what is happening  in government now, that I am worried about.

HB

 

mevans490
mevans490

@Historybuff @mevans490 

What the government does has bearing on the Marines, sure, but how people, or should I say, "How our Marinens are treated, is a disgrace."  The government has nothing to do about my comment.

Ridesnohorse
Ridesnohorse

Time to reinstate the draft-maybe we might get a better class of soldier instead of gun toting killers.

RichardSessoms
RichardSessoms like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

@Ridesnohorse What do you think Marines do best? We are trained to fight and kill. Anything else is secondary. 

dabears
dabears

@RichardSessoms @Ridesnohorse Couldn't agree more I was in the core late eighties early nineties.  Infantry Marines by day train to kill and are told most of you well loose people from your platton in battle and you expect choir boys.  There will always be troublemakers in all branches, but you have to take it with a grain of salt.  Some marines have a hard time distinguishing from training and fun, most are quality people but when you add alcohol to the mix you get problems. 

mevans490
mevans490 like.author.displayName 1 Like

@RichardSessoms @Ridesnohorse You stated the fact, Marines are trained to KILL.  Unfortunately, it is presumed that a Marine is weak when he asks for help in dealing with the atrocities that must take place during war.  The Marine Corp is and continues to do a disservice to the individuals by not recognizing the long term effects of the killing and providing assistance to these great warriors.

RB
RB like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

@Ridesnohorse 

Right, let's have a class of soldiers that can't tote guns and kill people. We can just replace the DoD with the Peace Corps and call it a day. If you don't want your dog to bite you then you shouldn't own one.


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