Six Ways the U.S. is Changing

The oil boom has legs, the recession is lingering and Maine is getting old

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There will be oil—so says a new report on the future of U.S. energy production

The population of the United States is growing, but barely. According to data released this week by the Census Bureau, the number of Americans grew by less than 1% – the lowest growth rate since the 1930s. What does that mean for the country? And what else can we learn about the nation’s changing demographics? Here are six takeaways from the Census’s latest numbers.

1. The recession lingers

Between July 1, 2012, and July 1, 2013, the U.S. population only grew by 0.72%, the lowest rate since 1937. Part of that has to do with less state-to-state migration, which means fewer people are moving around, finding better jobs, marrying and having kids. “Growth is slow,” says Ken Johnson, a demographer at the University of New Hampshire, “and I think it’s an effect from the recession.” Johnson says that while many economists say the recession’s over, he doesn’t see it playing out demographically. Rising birth rates and domestic migration are often a sign of a healthy economy, and both remain depressed.

2. People are moving to Florida again

Before the recession, Florida gained roughly 280,000 people a year. In 2005, 632,000 people left other parts of the country for the Sunshine State. But people started to leave during the recession, leading to a net loss in population. A large part of the state’s economy relies on continued growth — building subdivisions and housing, for example – and as it slowed, fewer people moved there while some of those who relied on construction jobs left. While Florida’s net population gain isn’t near where it was in 2005 and 2006, it has rebounded. Part of the reason is older New York residents fleeing the cold for the Florida sun. Andy Beveridge, a sociology professor at Queens College, says by 2014 Florida (pop. 19.5 million) will likely eclipse New York (19.6 million) as the third most populous state.

3. North Dakota’s oil boom has legs

The biggest percentage jump from 2012 to 2013 happened in North Dakota, which has seen a steady flow of workers coming to the state thanks to the oil and gas boom. But it’s not all energy jobs. “The growth is more widespread than just in the oil-producing areas,” Johnson says. “It also means there’s more money coming into the state and more opportunities. But migration is what’s fueling that rapid growth.”

4. Old and white = population loss

The only two states that lost population in 2013 were Maine and West Virginia, both of which have older, non-Hispanic populations. Whites tend to have lower fertility rates than other groups, and an older population will lead to fewer births. In Maine, the death rate has also been slowly growing as the population ages. In 2011, the state had more people die than were born for the first time. West Virginia has been losing younger residents as it coal jobs disappear, Johnson says.

5. Like California, with lower taxes

Both Nevada and Arizona continued to see higher growth rates than the rest of the country. Americans have been moving to the Southwest for decades, a region that has traditionally been a retirement destination for many in the Northeast and Midwest. But a number of businesses have also moved to the area in part to be as close to California as possible without paying the state’s higher tax rates. Still, Arizona and Nevada are lagging behind population growth rates from the mid-2000s.

6. The U.S. is becoming Europe

The population increase is so low that some experts believe that the U.S. will soon face the same demographic challenges of Europe: an aging population without enough young people. While it’s unclear how big of a factor low birth rates are in the latest figures, Johnson predicts that about 1 million births didn’t occur because of the recession. The U.S. birth rate has been falling for decades. Since the recession, it’s down to about 1.9 births per female. “The only thing that’s kept us away from becoming Europe is immigrants, or we’d already be there,” says Beveridge. But even immigrant birth rates have fallen in the last couple decades. According to the Pew Research Center, rates for foreign-born women decreased by 14% between 2007 and 2010 and fell 6% for U.S.-born women.

12 comments
Odin029
Odin029

The last paragraph states that only immigration has prevented the U.S. from becoming Europe... hasn't that always been the case? The US is the melting pot and Europe isn't. Well it wasn't. They're trying their hands at multiculturalism with mixed results.

Uncle-D-Orlando
Uncle-D-Orlando

Number#1- There was no 'Recession'. There was the Great Crash of 2007(which Geroge Bush Jr. tried to fic)-a great world wide economic crash. It is called a 'recession' by all U.S. media and politicians so that none of thje rich and powerful who caused it goes to jail. No one is tobalme for a 'recession'. But if there is a great economic U.S. crash-someone caused it.

tim1
tim1

7.  Socialist tyranny continues to increase also, just like Europe.  As the One World Government Banksters want. 

RobertBurkholder
RobertBurkholder

The US is becoming Europe-- And Christianity is  most unpopular in Europe. The bloody slaves of Allah will  defend whatever  nation they infest  as if it were Muslim territory. Or land  belonging to their bloody god of death and destruction.Christians will NOT .A story older than America. The bloody  worshipers of death  whose Sacred Writ enjoins them to "slay them wherever you find them"  nearly took all of Spain , and France, and Europe once before but were finally met by Charles Martel The Hammer came down God raised up a Christian standard --and eventually Columbus sailed past the towers of the Alhambra recently retaken from the enemy.Look at Europe--at Britain  today the Church is being forced underground  Islam is promoted and protected --and even in America our chosen leaders defend the enemy and penalize the Patriot.Time for God to raise up a new Hammer. Lest we all be made to live as Sodom and like unto Gomorrah.

StJohnny
StJohnny

It's the economy ,stupid. If America had stable employment larger families would be common.

The mass of people immigrating and not enough jobs to employ them has destabilized the existing American population.

Supply and demand.  Full employment is the answer.

tracytateski
tracytateski

Birth decline in USA related to no pto for working moms? Hmmmm. The USA is no place for raising a family.

DavidRam
DavidRam

Seems will continue the recession in 2014.

joukot
joukot

@tim1 Some Americans are funny. They blame socialism even for hurricanes. Socialism is dead except in North Korea and Vietnam and maybe some other developing countries. Even China now is fighting with the problems of capitalism. Socialism simply means government-owned economic life, including industries. Government regulated schools or health care are no more socialism than government-built highways. Tyranny can be socialist, capitalist, religious, or whatever. Any ideology can be used for personal advantage and misuse, even Christianity.

ccopeland48
ccopeland48

@RobertBurkholder Seriously you're off your rocker. This has absolutely nothing to do with the Berbers who might I add contributed tons to arts in Europe including how to bathe. It's simple less jobs equal less children. A college degree is nearly useless now so people have less money to move with. People are also considering having children or expanding existing families less. Leave Christianity and the blah blah blah out of the discussion. I don't see anything wrong with christian's in Europe slaughtering each other over nothing or the Popes whim. Oh yes but it's a problem for the Berbers seriously this is too funny. And what about the native lands around the world invaded n the name of God? Was it justified that mighty hammer hmm. I think it's time man stops using God as an excuse to justify sinful behavior. 

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