Report: Texas Rollercoaster Victim’s Body Was Found Partially Severed

Firefighters took an hour to find the body near the lower track of the ride

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Ronald Martinez / Getty Images

A view of The Texas Giant roller coaster at Six Flags Over Texas on July 22.

The body of a Texas woman who died when she was sent flying from a roller coaster in July was found partially severed and strewn across a roof, according to a new report.

The new report from the Arlington Police Department details the grisly death of Rosa Ayala-Gaona Esparza, 52, after she was flung from the Texas Giant roller coaster at a Six Flags amusement park on July 19. The report says it took firefighters an hour to find her body, the Houston Chronicle reports; it was “partially wrapped around” a support beam with her lower body lying on top of the roof and “nearly severed upper body hanging over the south side of the roof.”

Investigators interviewed 17 witnesses, including the coaster operator, who remembered thinking Esparza’s restraint was not all the way down on her thigh. The restraint was secure enough that the ride’s computer registered it as locked, the operator said.

Esparza’s daughter said she turned around and saw her mother upside down early in the ride, and witnesses sitting directly behind the victim said they tried to help when they saw Esparza’s feet in the air, but were unable to reach her, according to the report.

She was seated by herself in a car behind her daughter and son-in-law during the fatal accident. The victim’s family filed a lawsuit against Six Flags last month in district court, but the amusement park says independent contractors were liable for the design of the restraint system.

“Our hearts remain heavy about this accident and our sincerest condolences go out to Ms. Esparza’s family,” the park said in a statement Monday.

[Houston Chronicle]

10 comments
AbhishekKumar
AbhishekKumar

Shame on you Park operators for shunning the responsibility to own up to the loss of life caused by your faulty systems!

AlyssaEwingOwens
AlyssaEwingOwens

Was it really necessary to explain that her body was partially severed?  If I were in that woman's family, this would be an absolutely awful article to read. Prayers to family and friends.  And, if Six Flags doesn't make riders sign a waiver to free Six Flags of bodily harm or death on their rides, they are responsible.

ClauLuke
ClauLuke

Independent contractors are liable now? Wow, that's not what they say when they promote the park…

AlbertaNolem
AlbertaNolem

Well the park is guilty of buying things that doesn´t work!!!  How do they dare to send the responsability of this accident to somebody else?!!  everybody should stop going to that park till they  respond!

immargarita
immargarita

Was she fat?  I'm thinking she was obese and that that's why the restraint didn't go all the way down on her thighs.  $hit happens, sorry.  You know any time you're going to these amusement parks something can go wrong, nothing is 100% guaranteed.  If you don't die, you can still suffer injuries.  People that ski, jump out of planes, etc., they all know there's a risk. 

CrystalRyanDouglas
CrystalRyanDouglas

Ahh yeah... They need to pay up with a sincere apology. It is what it is 

Openminded1
Openminded1

Nice try six flags, you  are liable also for this woman's horrible death, it was still your ride and your operator. the degree of negligence is up to the jury, you may want to settle out of court before the jury sees the photos and hears the story of this death.

ZT205
ZT205

@Openminded1 Normally I'd agree, but if the operator was just following what the computer said, that's probably not operator error. It depends on exactly what specifications the equipment that was sold to Six Flags had-- if they followed instructions, then they weren't negligent.

Openminded1
Openminded1

@ZT205 @Openminded1 as I stated it will be up to a jury, as to the degree of negligence in a law suit like that all parties are sued, the park, the operator and the manufacturer of the equipment and even the comapny that sold it and built it. The lawyers go for the deep pockets, which means the actual operator employee is at the bottom of the list and 6 flags at the top.


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