Pilots in Asiana Crash Report Throttle Glitch

Claim contradicts results of U.S. probe, which failed to reveal mechanical or electrical errors

  • Share
  • Read Later

Asiana Airlines pilots involved in a deadly San Francisco plane crash earlier this year have told investigators that the failure of an automated speed-control system played a major role in the accident.

The pilots said that the auto-throttles disconnected without warning before the twin-engine jet slowed dramatically and hit a sea wall near a runway at San Francisco’s international airport, the Wall Street Journal reported on Monday.

This account differs from the safety board’s preliminary findings, which did not uncover any mechanical or electrical problems with the Boeing 777 prior to impact. Air safety officials previously said the pilots may have failed to activate the auto-throttle correctly, but Asiana maintenance logs detail a number of “uncommanded auto-throttle disconnects.”

[WSJ]

6 comments
rotorhead1871
rotorhead1871

the pilot in command reads the gripe sheets before he signs for the aircraft.  if this is a noted gripe, then the pilot should have been very aware of this issue and made the appropriate mental notes.....if not this responsible......he should have NEVER been in command of the aircraft...

DonAllen
DonAllen

If you were on a highway and set the cruise control in your car to 60 mph and it disconnected by itself, would you allow your speed to slow by over 20%, to less than 48 mph without intervening manually by taking over operation of the throttle? And suppose you were a student driver with an instructor with you and another driver in the back seat? Would all three of you fail to notice that the speed was deteriorating until you got hit from behind? That is the equivalent of what happened here.

Whether they set up the auto-throttle incorrectly or whether it malfunctioned is immaterial. As others have said, these guys had a responsibility to monitor their air-speed. It is perhaps the most critical variable during final approach. You can't set the auto-throttle and forget it. It certainly looks like these pilots were overly dependent on automation, trusted it too much, and failed to fly their airplane. 

 Put it this way: let's assume the auto-throttle failed, which is highly questionable. But let's give them that. Do you think if Captain Sullenberger had been in command of this flight and the auto-throttle failed, we'd be discussing this?

emeraldseatown
emeraldseatown

If you plan to blame the auto-throttle for your crashes, why have pilots on board at all?  The flight crew is there to make decisions and take responsibility for the safe conduct of flight; had they done so this crash probably wouldn't have happened.

briguy
briguy

Engaging autothrottle is not an excuse for neglecting to monitor airspeed. Strange, none of the other "uncommanded disconnects" resulted in the plane slamming into the ground. Really weak attempt to redirect blame.

WoodyChuck
WoodyChuck

If there was a history of auto-throttle disconnects, then the crew should either have been more closely monitoring its operation or they shouldn't have been using it at all. 

JohnMann
JohnMann

Sounds like a new excuse. Seems more like Wi Tu Lo.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,104 other followers