Storming the Beach: Semper Fi, Dude

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Sean Rowland / ASP via Getty Images

Julian Wilson of Australia surfs the Trestles last fall.

The last time the Marines fought over a beach was in 1950, at Inchon, Korea. Their victory there turned the tide in the Korean war. Now they’re battling surfers for a piece of the southern California coast. This time, they fear a Marine defeat could hurt U.S. national security.

The surfers want a prime slice of beach just north of San Diego — and part of the Marines’ Camp Pendleton — officially listed by the National Register of Historic Places. The leathernecks fear that such a designation will tie them up in red tape, and complicate and delay their trademark amphibious training.

“A lot of us are surfers,” Marine Brigadier General Vincent Coglianese, commander at Camp Pendleton, tells Battleland (he boogie-boards, and is weighing a move up to a paddle board). “We just don’t want it historically listed.”

US Navy Uses LCAC Hover Craft to Land Marines and Equipment

David McNew / Getty Images)

The Marines come ashore at Camp Pendleton.

The Marines and surfers have existed peacefully, side by side, for decades at the Trestles beach, part of the 125,000-acre Camp Pendleton Marine base three miles south of San Clemente. That would supposedly continue if the National Register of Historic Places designates the beach as historic.

But the Marines’ job is to prepare for the worst case. They fear the designation will wound, perhaps critically, their training. “Right now the surfers coexist with us. They have everything they need as far as the surfing beach. We preserve that history. We’re proud of that,” Coglianese says. “We don’t understand the push to make this a historical site.”

But it is a pretty historic place.

President Nixon was out for a walk in 1969 when he added an extra mile to his stroll along the beach at San Clemente. He came across a beautiful stretch of oceanfront, officially closed to the public since the creation of Camp Pendleton in 1942.

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Nixon Library

President and Mrs. Nixon along the Pacific not far from the Trestles.

That would be Trestles, a collection of surfing spots along San Onofre State Beach. Granting public access since 1971 to some of the world’s best surf since is a little-known Nixon legacy. This 3.5-mile (later extended to 5 miles) stretch of coastline, includes the 2.25-mile swath known as Trestles. It runs west along the Camp Pendleton border and Pacific Ocean and has since become one of the world’s great surfing meccas.

Nixon said he wanted to “provide an endowment of parklands and recreational areas…and make the beauties of the earth and sea more accessible.” He also wanted to help the local economy. It worked: the area is now home to three surfing magazines and several surfboard makers. The nearly 1 million annual visitors – many attracted by the local surf – bring in an estimated $10 million to local businesses.

Then-California governor Ronald Reagan strongly endorsed the opening of the beach. He saw it as a gift to future generations. “Unless we can preserve and protect the unspoiled areas which God has given us, we will have nothing to leave them,” the future President said. “As stewards of this land, we must use it judiciously and with a great sense of responsibility.”

The beach originally became a surfer’s haven in the 1930’s, and diehard surfers kept riding its waves even once the federal government closed it shortly after World War II began. They willingly risked citations, confiscation of their boards — and even bullets flying over their sun-streaked heads — to catch its epic waves.

The Navy-owned property — celebrated in the Beach Boys’ 1963 hit Surfin’ USA – is leased to the state of California, under a 50-year agreement due to end in 2021. For 42 years, the Marines have been, by all accounts, conscientious stewards of the coastline. They’ve limited their amphibious training to a small slice of the oceanfront because of a nearby nuclear power plant, an interstate highway, and assorted environmental restrictions.

The landing craft air cushion (LCAC) lands with Ma

ANDREW SILK / AFP / Getty Images

Surf’s up for both Marines and surfers along Camp Pendleton’s roughly 20 miles of coastline.

The Surfrider Foundation, whose mission is “the protection and enjoyment of beaches, oceans and waves,” agrees the service has been good caretakers. But its members were spurred into nominating Trestles for a listing on the National Register of Historic Places following a controversial toll road proposal near the Trestles that was put on hold in 2008, although it continues to be debated. “The toll road fight brought attention to the historical significance of Trestles and San Onofre,” says Mark Rauscher, coastal preservation manager at Surfrider Foundation. “We saw the opportunity to get the first surfing area listed on the register and worked with the state to move it forward.”

Supporters say Trestles qualifies for the list because it is “virtually unparalleled in Southern California, due to high quality waves and the aesthetics of clean water and a still-natural environment.”  Not only that: it also warrants inclusion “for its role in the establishment of surfing as a recreation, a lifestyle, a culture, and a part of the Southern California cultural identity.”

The Marines – surprise! — disagree.

They argue the beach doesn’t past muster as an historic site. Beyond that, the corps says designating the beach as historic would have serious and negative impacts on training and operations at Camp Pendleton.

“Trestles is not the sole example – or even the best example – of a property type important in illustrating the historic context of surfing in the United States,” Donald Schregardus, the Navy’s environmental chief, has told the California State Office of Historic Preservation.

Battle Re-Enactment

Getty Images

20th Century Fox re-created the Guadalcanal landing for a film at Camp Pendleton in 1945, with 700 Marines, 62 landing boats, and six fighter planes playing roles, as did some real actors.

Even the surfers acknowledge that Camp Pendleton’s beaches have seen a lot of history. The local sands have “witnessed myriad units and amphibious craft and ships, including the Higgins boat being offloaded from Liberty ships, the Landing Ship Tank (LST) scuttling itself on Green Beach to disembark its supplies, and the Landing Vehicle Tracked (LVT) coming ashore with Marines to take their objective,” Surfrider’s application for the historic designation says.

Marines trained for Korea and Vietnam operations – which happened – and for amphibious operation during 1991’s Persian Gulf War against Iraq, which didn’t. There hasn’t been a major Marine amphibious assault since that Inchon landing 63 years ago.

Coglianese, Pendleton’s top officer, says jarheads and surfers have shared the beach without problems since the Vietnam war. The corps doesn’t want the complications that a historical listing might mean. “We’re concerned that would infringe on the No. 1 purpose of what we try to do,” he says, “which is to train young men and women to go into harm’s way.”

The Marines believe that designating a Trestles Historic District would lead to consultations and negotiations with surfers and their government allies that would inevitably complicate and delay needed training. They also see it as a kick in the teeth, given all that the corps has done to take care of the beach over the past 70 years. “We object to subjecting our activities, which have not been so regulated over the years, to regulation of an area that exists as it does today primarily due to our Marine Corps’ presence and mission,” says Stanley Norquist, a top Marine environmentalist at Pendleton.

Screen Shot 2013-05-03 at 3.05.28 PM copy 7

Google Maps

The Marines also argue that a decision to give the beach historical status could hurt national security. “Recently the President has reemphasized our strategy toward the Pacific,” Coglianese says. “The beaches are critical. The reason we’re on the ocean is because of amphibious training. It concerns me greatly when people, meaning well, are trying to move forward to possibly encroach or limit our training.”

Proponents say the listing won’t change anything. Surfriders’ petition for the historic designation, they note, contains an escape hatch that allows the Marines to seek Trestles’ removal from the list if the corps’ “military training exercises and/or operations are adversely affected.”

The Marines believe such assurances are as skimpy as a pair of Speedos. Coglianese declares them “unenforceable” and dangerous to the corps’ role in defending the nation. “This mission cannot be compromised or otherwise subordinated to another land use – as would be the case if the THD is listed or found eligible for listing,” he wrote the California State Office of Preservation last winter.

The Marines have always fared well on real battlefields, as well as on the political ones back in Washington, D.C. But they’re facing a struggle in the Golden State.

The tides of history may be shifting against them. In February, California’s Historical Resources Commission dismissed the Marines’ concerns when it voted unanimously to approve the listing. A final decision from the National Register of Historic Places could come at any time.

55 comments
RonWootton
RonWootton

With all that discussion..there is still no particular reason for requesting a historical site designation as it is already protected and accessible...except for the obvious potential for a lawsuit and therefore more income for the Surfrider Foundation.

and btw a Marine Landing Team did in fact do a "Landing" in Mogadishu to cover the withdrawal of our forces...that's the one where the TVnews cameras were looking down the barrels held by some very cautious Marines...and being thankful they weren't inflitrated by some of the "insurgents"...

RobertJSebold
RobertJSebold

Matt n Sarah of course I served! however, the Marines that taught me how to run and fight (Devil Pup) (Military Police Explorers) (Military Pre service Training school) I think i was 15 yrs old then.. were Crazy in a good way and I opted for the Army.. after serving I went on to become a professional body boarder . I surfed CP for MANY years..  Funny thing is My dad who was a Marine. would NEVER write to someone that way you did.. really rude. And he certainly taught me to never write or speak to anyone in the manner that you write.. have some pride in your lineage as a Marine and grow some patience.. ps and get out there and paddle around a bit you would love it ! SIR.


ncsandiego
ncsandiego

The area in question is not actively used for training by the military.  It is actually a very popular state park.  The marines do their beach training several miles to the south, not at Trestles.  This so-called "conflict" has been trumped up by the press to drive readership and ad-dollars.  Surfers were at this beach long before the Marines were, and they've lived in harmony for most of that time.  I support recognizing Trestles for historic significance.  This won't impact the military at all.

RobertJSebold
RobertJSebold

Ps having lived on CP I can tell you that the Marine Corps really is a good steward to the environment.. there is so much wildlife and natural features to CP.. I remember finding a wounded hawk once and i called the game warden on a sunday and they came out right away and picked the bird up to rehabilitate it .. same with Owls n stuff that i found. I love Camp Pend. !! 


Novowel4me
Novowel4me

Trestles has been a surfing spot since I was a kid in the 50's.  There is no conflict between surfers and Marines.  Most Marine training exercises take place far south of Trestles and between Trestles and where the Marines actually conduct their training exercises is San Onofre State Beach.  Between San Onofre State Beach and the City of Oceanside is all Camp Pendleton and about (twenty miles of coastline)  The opposition to designating the site Historic is misguided.

RobertJSebold
RobertJSebold

Trestles.. you can have it.. I would rather surf 21 area  ;) since i was 12..  

ThomasLeigh-Kendall
ThomasLeigh-Kendall

Semper Fi Brothers, we were trained well on the Camp Pendleton Beach, it has trained millions Id guess, and will millions more. Unless we are giving up our #1 training grounds to a bunch of old none combative, so they can surf or picnic. I would never surrender, its how we were trained. ON THAT BEACH it was attack attack attack and forward to the hills of Camp Pendleton. served 1956 to 1963 and still support my younger  brothers. GUNG HO

keithi.77
keithi.77

Another former jar who served for 3 years on Camp Pendleton (now residing in SD County).  I agree with the other former marine who said this has nothing to do with any battle between surfers and marine training.  This has everything to do with some developer or road builders group of lawyers that do not want to have any red tape in the way when San Onofre nuclear plant shuts down and suddenly there are "public needs" to put in another highway or a sub-division of homes (or something).  All of the beach landing training is done nearer to the other end of the beachfront property on the base.  Nearest to Trestles on the base is a nice little trailer park for acitive and retired military to stay at.  It should stay as is for another 100yrs with or without the historical designation...

justagame
justagame

First, there is no conflict at all between Marines and surfers at Trestles.  Some posting comments seem to have that impression.  My son surfs there 4-5 times per week and I have never heard of any issues at all.  They all get along fine.

As for the Historical designation, I can see why some think it isn't necessary based on the fact that all who use it get along just fine.  If the designation is a tool that can be used to preserve it from being swallowed up by developers, then I am all for it.  As a resident of San Clemente, I am against the toll road expansion because I know it will only be the tip of the iceberg.  If, however, this designation will allow for government extremists on the "protection of the environment" side of life to use it as a way to shut the use of the beach down to everyone, then that would be a major problem.  I always fear giving the government abusing their power.

I think more information is needed on the "true" impact of this designation and what it will be used for before anyone could make a serious judgement for or against it.

joblack
joblack

Gee this is tough one. If the surfers can't agree to the established routine, make it a jarhead beach only both for amphibious work and marine surfing. 

€€_Matt_&_Sarah_€€
€€_Matt_&_Sarah_€€

I am a former HM1 (FMF), I agree with leather-neck up there. We as veterans or active duty military serve our country. We fight for our rights and uphold them as we have since the birth of this nation. Although the nationality landscape has changed, we changed with it. So must our Devil Dogs. Please know my MARINES are heros. SIX Marines landed in Egypt with a naval officer and diplomat to overtake Tripoli's government and inserted a former Tripoli leader who would not attack our merchant ships. The didnt stop, complain, or squabble over where to train, it was that they did. Libya is the modern day name of Tripoli, since then our MARINES have engaged in every war or conflict without question and with do prejudice to our enemies. As we all should agree that "By the PEOPLE for the People" gives us life to pursue happiness. They can find areas for training, but Americans want land that belongs to us/them not the government nor the extension of it.... MARINES. I served in Iraq and have served with Seabees and Marines; we can do; we adapt and improvise; we change for America; never should we ask her to change for our military, that which protects those rights we are guaranteed. I don't surf, think its ridiculous, but I love the beach; so, as a disabled veteran if I want beach that improves State and Federal economy with increased revenue and makes Americans and her international friends welcome, then America is the "LAND of the FREE and HOME of the Brave" both civilians and military are not mutually exclusive, rather one is the same as the other for freedom brave men and women provide that so the Land may be for the free! Our nation is without question the best country in the world!!! Devil Dogs!!!! Hooraaaaa never let this argument affect you, you are loved and idolized by us all!! This is top brass afraid of change, evolution, and people's rights. In the end the " People" speak united and it will always be "LAND of the FREE" or what the hell did me and army jack wagon up there go fight our enemies to be wounded and lose our friends for these rights and ideas, not perfect but we strive to be....we are proud and our county knows it, give these kids or adults the choice they want for their lifestyle. Lest we forget military and politics should never combine, don't start now. Signed HM1 (FMF) disabled combat veteran and green all the way.

SergeDedina
SergeDedina

The proposed designation of Trestles as an historic site will have no impact on the ability of the Marine Corps to carry out operations at Camp Pendleton. The Marine Corps played a critical role in pushing back the effort of the TCA to put a private toll road through San Onofre State Beach Park and Camp Pendleton. Unfortunately this article is designed to create a conflict that really doesn't exist. The real threat is the ongoing effort of the TCA to put a highway through Camp Pendleton and San Onofre State Beach. 

The Marine Corps has worked collaboratively with conservation groups for years to preserve the natural resources of Camp Pendleton, which the Marines to their credit have cited as examples for their need to keep their base intact and free from development. 

Serge Dedina, Executive Director of WILDCOAST, author of Wild Sea.

Killbot6745
Killbot6745

The historic designation has absolutely nothing to do with the Marines' stewardship of Trestles.  It is a defensive maneuver attempting to prevent the construction of a toll highway through the adjacent open space.  Developers, who have annihilated the rest of Southern California's open areas, want to build a toll highway to open up more space to build more houses (colloquially known as McMansions).  The Surfrider Foundation, among others, has been attempting to preserve the current experience.  I don't see anything wrong with that; not *every* square inch of land needs a house on it.  

bruce949
bruce949

There is so much ignorance on this thread. So many people have no idea what constitutes national security, and so few are unaware of why there's a push for the historical designation in the first place. 

buffalo.barnes102
buffalo.barnes102

As a former Marine who was actually stationed at Camp Del Mar (24 Area) ('66 thru '68) AND surfed there at the Beach Club (A great little left off the jetty that leads into the "basin") and all along the Camp Pendleton beaches (Eat your hearts out, civilians!), I actually participated in some amphibious landings all along that coastline. I was a driver on an LVTP-5A1 (Google it!). Only once did we ever go anywhere near Trestles. As a former instructor in Tracked Vehicle Schools, we took our students "land driving" along long stretches of beach, including Red Beach, usually the "showplace" for mock landings for "the Brass" and Congressmen. Further in from the beaches are many trails and roads that passed under then Hwy. 101 and later, the 405 Freeway that allowed us access to the interior of Camp Pendleton. Methinks the General doth protest too much. The Trestles area has been "occupied" by civilians for many years and the Trestles and San-O's areas are of no real use to the Marines. IMHO. SEMPER FI! 

cslagenhop
cslagenhop

The bottom line is:  All these designations are tools by the environazi's to tie up public and private lands in a quagmire of legal red tape so they can further their leftist agenda.   I stand with the Marines- I also wish these kind of things would stop.  This has ruined the desert for those of us who used to explore and enjoy the wilderness, now we cannot do it without some BLM hack out there telling us we are disturbing the habitat of some pissant fly or something.   

ncsandiego
ncsandiego

This stretch of beach is already a state park and the Marines already work with the park officials whenever they want to do something there, which is extremely rare.  An historic designation won't change any of that.  Not to mention there are multiple other historic listings on Camp Pendleton that the marines seem to manage to work around.  And recall that Nixon originally told the Marines to GIVE San Onofre and Trestles to the state, instead they decided to make it a lease.  It seems they are upset over nothing really.

MilesKellyBaughman
MilesKellyBaughman

As a fifty year old having grown up in San Clemente and surfed, Cottons Point , Barb Wires, Old Mans, Upper & Lower Tresles and San Onofre in my youth I don't see a problem here for the Marine Corps. This area is already adjacent to San Onofre State Park and San Onofre nuclear power plant this would not interfere with the Marines training area which is further south.

This is a historical site and being part of a 5 generation family of surfers I think its fitting to have it be officially named as such!

A little FYI - does it no seem odd that the largest Marine base in the USA is right next to a operational nuclear power plant? Now what do you think is a higher security concern?

Semper Fi!

MarcShakter
MarcShakter

 Why can't it be listed as historic but leave everything else the way it already is? Just put up the little historic sign and everyone just keep doing what they were doing? I don't see why it has to be a fight if all sides already get along and share usage of the beaches?

JeffreyVonStetten
JeffreyVonStetten

camp pendleton has miles and miles of beach area all the way up to oceanside for goodness sakes, they have more than enough to screw around on and almost never ever are anywhere near trestles. If they made it a historic spot, it would protect it from a large amount of exploitation from private real estate, city, state, and military intrusions. I think it's a great idea and I'l vote for it if I can. 

Andisoss
Andisoss

I am a native Californian, member of our Armed Forces and I tend to "lean left" in terms of politics. I am a firm believer of "if it aint' broke, don't fix it!". Things are fine the way they are. The Marine Corp has done an outstanding job keeping Trestles beautiful and clean. Very seldom (if ever) are the surfers turned away due to a pending military exercise.

Anyone ever been to Culebra or Vieques in Puerto Rico? They have some of the most incredible beaches in Puerto Rico (or the world for that matter) in part because the military preserved it so well.

California cannot pay its bills as it is and the last thing they need to do is take on another project paid for with IOU's from the tax payers.

malburro
malburro

This whole issue was sparked by the TCA (Transportation Corridor Agency) and the toll road briefly mentioned in the article, and it's not just surfers, liberals, and Kalifornians (as people say) who oppose the toll road.  The petition to put Trestles on a historic registry started not because of Marines, but because of this proposed 241 toll road.  Dumping a six lane highway and demolishing a piece of history would be damaging, and could certainly be an infringement on National Security.  Putting the beach on the National Historic Registry would doubtfully trash it, if you've ever been to Trestles you know that it is not an easily accessible place.  As was said, Marines still have a very long stretch of coastline, and I've never seen them use Trestles.  They rarely go north of the nuclear power plant.  This article is misleading, it's easy to get behind a national security vs. surfers argument.  Unfortunately that's not the truth.  Do more research

Game_Adrenaline
Game_Adrenaline

I've been surfing Trestles since I was a kid and I have never once seen any military vehicles or activity on or even near the stretch of property that Trestles occupies.  Why?  Because 100 yards north of "uppers" is San Clemente and 100 yards south of "lowers" is San Onofre camp grounds.  I'm all in favor of the Navy/Marines having the land they need to train, but they have another 18 miles of beach front property south of Trestles.  They don't need control over this little strip of beach that's so close to civilian housing?  They have over 125k acres at their disposal.  Let this little beach go on the historical list and move on to more important things. 

hilltanktx
hilltanktx

Maybe if we get enough hikers together, we could take over Area 51.  I've always been so curious.  Let's give it a try and see what happens.

SactoMan81
SactoMan81

That beach is US government property--and is part of a very active military base. Sorry surfers, the US government has higher priority in this case.

rfoster07
rfoster07

I'm a surfer from Florida and I agree that the Marines should maintain control of this stretch of beach as they have done for decades. The national security is more important than the "wants" of a few.

jack_k1
jack_k1

The solution is simple. The Navy should void the lease, reclaim the land, block it from public access, and prosecute trespassers. Once they've completed that process, they can join up with the surfers and the liberals at the negotiation table to see if they might reach some sort of compromise that places America's national security needs first. 

jackrabbit90813
jackrabbit90813

Camp Pendleton is the best example of preservation in all of California. The Marines have done an excellent job! Trestles is not unique. Trestles is only beautiful because the Marine Corps has done a great job of preserving it. If you want to see what the surfers will do, go north to Newport, Huntington and Bolsa Chica. They are trash cans!

There is a scheduled manuever this summer, I want to go sit on the 405 and watch! God Bless the US Marine Corps!

Surf Rider Foundation is fast becoming the Sierra Club, a liberal mess of hypocrites.  If this continues, I suggest that the Marine Corps cut off all public access. Teach the wackos  to keep their mouths shut!

sef1904
sef1904

Leave it to the eco-freaks, especially the Kalifornia sub-species of eco-freak, to endanger the combat readiness of the U.S. Military.

Scott

€€_Matt_&_Sarah_€€
€€_Matt_&_Sarah_€€

I am a hospital corpsman and I can't catch waves I'm disabled from combat saving marines in Iraq, condescending remarks of my heratige does not rebute your selfishness; and Marines I've buried three blocks from where I live in Arlington cemetery would say to you quit trying sympathy card own up to being self centered and find was to say you served but vague, later in fact. I don't want to play who's served more or sacrificed more, but find a Marine and say what you said to me, but tell them it was to their devel doc. So surf while I maneuver my wheelchair jerk, and stop the sympathy ignorant attacks of condescending bravado and if your that motto pick a riffle up and stand a post devil pup!

€€_Matt_&_Sarah_€€
€€_Matt_&_Sarah_€€

But of course this article isn't about "you" so have what? Did you file historical rights or protest? Are you a Marine? Egotistical behavior does tend to irate those who have or are surging and surfers wanting civil liberties; therefore, try a comic section for your winking one liners please. Thank you.

JeffreyVonStetten
JeffreyVonStetten

@cslagenhop "All these designations are tools by the environazi's to tie up public and private lands in a quagmire of legal red tape so they can further their leftist agenda. " dude... what does that even mean? could you be less specific and use more bizarre generalizations if you tried? Can you please try to reel it in and bee more specific and less emotional and general? What you said makes no sense. It sound like a bunch or garbled radio talk show gibberish. Trestles, marines, land, anything, please stay on topic.


aaarauz07
aaarauz07

@cslagenhop - wow... so witty 'environazis', so smart you.  Just another dbag parroting your hillbilly heroin addled god, limbaugh.  sad and ignorant you are.   

bruce949
bruce949

@cslagenhop So many things wrong with your post. 1. Your hypocrisy - You want to be able to "enjoy" the desert, but interference is apparently preventing you from enjoying it, evidently in it's entirety. However, you're opposed to the meddling which would ensure that people who want to enjoy a short stretch of beach, will continue to be able to do so. 2. Your Rush Limbaugh style rhetoric associating nazism with people who have a conscience about the future of our lands. 3. Your generalism, intimating that only "leftist" people care about the lands they live on or around. 4. Your ignorance about the issues (it's not about surfers vs. Marines) and 5. You implying that you're out exploring and enjoying the desert in some esoteric way. Somehow I'm not picturing you out there hiking and camping. I, too, love riding motorcycles in the desert, but I have no problem with areas being protected from the noise and knobbies of OHV's. It's not a right to be able to drive a car or ride a motorcycle. It's a privilege. If enough people want to protect an area from the desires of a destructive minority - then so be it.

shepherdwong
shepherdwong

@cslagenhop:"This has ruined the desert..."

Sure. Limiting where you can run your knobbies over land and habitat is what has "ruined the desert." More Glibertarian genius at work right there

bruce949
bruce949

@Andisoss True, the relationship with the Marine Corps isn't broke, but that's not the motivation. It's to protect it from the toll road. The toll road has been shot down as emphatically as possible, by vote and decree, and yet the toll road agency is again making plans to find a way to push it through. This designation has nothing to do with Marine Stewardship.


OCResident
OCResident

@malburro It's more the truth than your assertion the road would be "dumped" anywhere near Trestles. The final plan has it merging with Interstate 5 on the inland side of the freeway .. the trumped-up "save Trestles" campaign was based on the possibility that bridge pilings in San Mateo Creek way upstream could affect stream flows, which could affect the cobble distribution in the sea beneath Trestles which could affect the waves .... A lot of maybes, and even surf experts said there'd be no impact.  None of it about the appearance, all about the waves. The surfers don't want more people finding "their" beach. 

Surfrider wants to portray itself as a group of do-good environmentalists, but it's nothing more than a highly sophisticated special-interest lobbyist group.


bruce949
bruce949

@SactoMan81 The US government is supposed to be "of the people and by the people". Civilian leadership tells the military what to do. And the civilian leadership (Nixon and Reagon - both Republicans if that matters to you) both decreed it to be made permanently available to civilians. Sorry, SactoMan81.

bruce949
bruce949

@jack_k1 Because a few miles of coast really make a difference in national security... Ignorance is blissful thing, isn't it?

BobLauer
BobLauer

Sorry but if you're going to watch from the 405 you'll never see it as that ends in Irvine. Bottom line I grew up in SD and have lived in South OC since the late 80's. I've been at uppers, lowers Old Man's many many times, not to mention all over SanO. We've jet ski'd within legal limits of the power plant and never ever had the Marines bother us or exclude us. They've been the best of neighbors. This is about the TCA and toll road pure and simple. As far as the "surfers" turning Newport or HB or Bolsa into trash cans, it's the general beach going population which includes all groups and ethnicities not just surfers. In fact the surfers at most locations are outnumbered 5 to 1 with just regular old people. So much of your statement is just wrong. Me personally I have no probelm with it staying just like it is but expect there to be debate, legislation and tax dollars spent to promote or defend against the toll road in years to come. The marines use the stip of beach @@9 miles south almost exclusively for training and the hill sides east of the 5 for tank training. I've had the pleasure of seeing this many many times and it is spectacular.

BobLauer
BobLauer

It's simply got very little to with that and is primarily for the stopping of the toll road extension which ahs been voted down many times. The TCA wants to extend the 241 from OSO Parkway to just North of there adding millions of toll dollars and access. As fas as housing goes a akrge chunk is developed in East San Clemente, Talega and alot of it all up thru San Juan and MV.

bruce949
bruce949

@TrajanSaldana Sure. Read Killbot6745's comments above mine. And if you think a few miles of beach in Southern California, between a city and a state park is going to affect national security because the marines will have to talk to civilians about it, then you're apparently extraordinarily naive or supremely paranoid. There is not one single specific argument that can be made that that stretch of land could have any impact on national security.

€€_Matt_&_Sarah_€€
€€_Matt_&_Sarah_€€

How intelligent to judge him and not his words, you need to see what you are doing with name calling, you're not a child spatting off at siblings. Respect others and yourself! Because if you don't no one will. Intelligence? Wow hillbilly?? Insults wow what an insecurity you've shared with us!!

€€_Matt_&_Sarah_€€
€€_Matt_&_Sarah_€€

Same to you sir, his words are his not to be confused with him, attacking him is not a way to help someone understand you...you've already lost the hope of that, yet now you've belittled a mans thoughts and then the man, please respect him if not how do you respect yourself, or want others too....

Killbot6745
Killbot6745

@OCResident @malburro   Don't you think it would be nice to have a surf spot where you're not staring at a tract house development?  It's not ALL about waves, it's about preserving the spot as it is.  There's nothing wrong with a group of people fighting for the preservation of a resource against - what?  MORE houses?  There is no replacement for Trestles - while there are literally THOUSANDS of replacements for the tract houses to be built thanks to the proposed toll road.  
If the Marines were to help slam the door shut (and lock it) on that toll road, there'd be no need for the historic landmark designation.  Unfortunately, Southern California belongs to the developers, not the residents.  

malburro
malburro

@OCResident @malburro Again, the truth being that the whole issue started over the debate of the toll road, whereas this article would lead you to believe that the issue is mostly surfers vs. Marines. 

bruce949
bruce949

@€€_Matt_&_Sarah_€€ His words are not to be confused with him? Is that even possible?- Attacking him? I was refuting his assertions. Do you understand the difference? - Belittled a man's thoughts? What does "debate" mean to you? - I don't respect myself? Wow.


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