On Patrol Along the U.S.-Mexico Border

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An immigration bill being written in the U.S. Senate aims to clamp down on illegal crossings along the southwestern border with Mexico while maintaining a 13-year timetable for existing illegal residents to win citizenship. The idea is to create tough law-and-order provisions that backers could argue would finally fix a porous U.S. border, as well as keeping foreigners who have obtained visas from overstaying them. The irony at present is that, despite the longstanding anti-immigrant hysteria in the U.S., net migration from Mexico to the U.S. has fallen likely below zero. Here, TIME looks at U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agents at work along the U.S.-Mexico border at the end of March 2013.

More Photography from Time

3 comments
SethE
SethE

Border patrol agents are the biggest D-Bags on earth. When did the notion end that the United States was the country that took in the "poor, huddled masses" and gave everyone the equal opportunity to the pursuit of happiness? We soon forget that the immigrants of the 19th and 20th century were the Irish, Italians, Germans, Blacks, Chinese, and Indians. Why we've changed our target to the spanish: Mexican, Guatemalan, Salvadorian, Honduran, Nicaraguan I cannot figure out...

TroyOwen
TroyOwen

They won't change much if any, let's see them stop Mexicans from running north when they want.

We cannot even shoot them if we see them! (Boarder Patrol)

I want to see what comes out of this but I don't think it will be much.

nerd
nerd

I've got a suggestion.  My ex-wife was a legal immigrant.  Later, when she became a naturalized US citizen, she and I petitioned 4 siblings to join us.  Normally, when an alien is petitioned by two US citizens, the wait time for siblings or parents is usually 3 years or less.  In their case, it took 6 years.  Why?  Because petition approvals are "pushed back" to take account of the estimates of illegal immigration.  When the siblings finally arrived - and when they realized why their petition approvals took so long ... well, let's just say they weren't happy.

The suggestion?  Hire and train legal immigrants for border patrol positions - immigrants whose petitions were similarly "pushed back" to make way for illegals to waltz across the border (and be treated like "visiting royalty" by the government).  True, I suspect there might be more violence on the border.  A lot of legal immigrants are eager for "payback."  But when illegals were responsible for taking 3 years of income out of a legal immigrant's wallet (just as surely as if they'd taken that money at gunpoint), who could blame legal immigrants for being more vigilant border guards.


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