Chinese Hackers Have Not Attacked Battleland

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Actually, they may have, but our crack cyber-security team has kept them at bay, as far as well can tell.

8 comments
rorywong654
rorywong654

' They may have',F#ck me dead Time.I think Time is not worth to read anymore.Bye with all the F#cking US media

FredGrandLedgeMI
FredGrandLedgeMI

In the years and decades since then, I have often thought – perhaps incorrectly -- that the present dominant subsenses of meaning of hacker, all related to software, were the result of MIT students, computer-science majors (known as Course VI-3 majors at MIT in the late 1960’s), having an impact on the culture during their subsequent careers.Those CS majors chose to refer to their respected colleagues by a term that they picked up as undergraduates. I believe its history on the MIT campus predates the presence of computers and the practice of programming.

Of course, both “hack” and “hacker” have long histories in the English language with respect to senses of meaning unrelated to software, skill, high competence, or its pursuit.

(Part 4 of 4)

FredGrandLedgeMI
FredGrandLedgeMI

As an aside, I am keen to mention that I used a terminal on the MULTICS system for one homework assignment while at MIT.At a time when programming often included the laborious and time-consuming task of punching a deck of cards and submitting the deck for a run on a mainframe computer, having access to immediate execution and results was liberating, a very welcome advancement foreshadowing (to think of it!) the individual ownership of computers.In addition, I subsequently took a programming course under Prof. Vinton Cerf at Stanford University, who was working on the ARPANET project at the time and who shares credit for devising the TCP/IP protocol. Noteworthy here, I never recall hearing the noun “hacker” in connection with programmers at that time. I had contact with MIT computer-science majors, and I don’t recall hearing them refer to themselves as hackers, either.

(Part 3 of N)

FredGrandLedgeMI
FredGrandLedgeMI

The MIT-student senses of meaning circa 1969 of “hacker” and “hack” are somewhat related to “technical adeptness and a delight in solving problems and overcoming limits,” which is noted in the first sentence of the source you quote.Specifically, a “hack” was a difficult but harmless stunt, usually possessing a mischievous aspect, performed for the amusement of some portion of the MIT community.Lore concerning fabled glorious hacks of the past, ranged from transporting in parts and assembling a Volkswagen beetle on the roof of a campus building to filling a living associate’s room with balloons or cushioning peanuts during his absence.“Hackers” performed the hacks.“Hacker” was an honorific.

(Part 2 of N)

FredGrandLedgeMI
FredGrandLedgeMI

@Don_Bacon I checked out the article you refer to, which was worthwhile.

In 1969, I arrived at the MIT campus for my freshman year.I was introduced to new words by other students in my area of my dormitory that were either invented by students at MIT or bestowed with special senses of meaning, including the words “hack” and “hacker.”Although the MULTICS project was underway at MIT then, MULTICS being an “influential early time-sharing operating system” (Wikipedia), I got the strong impression as an undergraduate that the terms in the special senses that they were used by MIT students of that era had a history of use predating the arrival of computers on the MIT campus and the ARPANET project. 

(Part 1 of N)

Don_Bacon
Don_Bacon

The word  "hacker" is apparently open to various interpretations and descriptions, kind of like "assault weapon." So I checked it out. From a source:

What Is a Hacker?

There are a bunch of definitions of the term ‘hacker’, most having to do with technical adeptness and a delight in solving problems and overcoming limits. If you want to know how to become a hacker, though, only two are really relevant.

There is a community, a shared culture, of expert programmers and networking wizards that traces its history back through decades to the first time-sharing minicomputers and the earliest ARPAnet experiments. The members of this culture originated the term ‘hacker’. Hackers built the Internet.

There is another group of people who loudly call themselves hackers, but aren't. These are people (mainly adolescent males) who get a kick out of breaking into computers and phreaking the phone system. Real hackers call these people ‘crackers’ and want nothing to do with them. Real hackers mostly think crackers are lazy, irresponsible, and not very bright, and object that being able to break security doesn't make you a hacker any more than being able to hotwire cars makes you an automotive engineer.

The basic difference is this: hackers build things, crackers break them.
http://www.catb.org/esr/faqs/hacker-howto.html#what_is

Chinese crackers? I thought they sere put in egg-drop soup.

Don_Bacon
Don_Bacon like.author.displayName 1 Like

@Don_Bacon In the last sentence above, obviously "sere" should be ""were." I have trouble with the iddy-biddy print and there's no edit function  My brain is like new but my eyes are 75 years old.  In fact they never were that good but at least they kept me out of the Tank Corps. Perhaps Battleland could do a LARGE PRINT EDITION?


This comment has been deleted

MarkThompson_DC
MarkThompson_DC

@Don_Bacon Don - You should be able to increase the size of Battleland posts on your own computer! Cheers, M-30-

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