When Colleges Look Up Applicants on Facebook: The Unspoken New Admissions Test

High school seniors applying to college have always had to worry about GPAs, SATs and resumes and. But with the rise of social media has come a whole new set of challenges – namely what to scrub from your digital identity

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Photo-Illustration by Alexander Ho for TIME; Classroom: Getty Images

Judging by its Facebook network, Hastings High School in New York has one strange senior class. A student named “FunkMaster Floikes” is somehow rubbing shoulders with Lizzie McGuire and the fictional parents from That ‘70s Show. Meanwhile Samwise Gams (a nickname of a hobbit in Lord of the Rings) is listed as a 2012 alum. At first glance, such social media profiles have all the makings of crude online pranks. But in reality, they have been strategically created by actual Hastings seniors determined to shield themselves from the prying eyes of college admissions officers. “There’s a fairly big party scene there,” says Sam “Samwise” Bogan, who is now a freshman at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania. “When the college search process comes around, people start changing their Facebook name or untagging old photos that they don’t want anyone to see. It’s kind of a ritual.”

Amid decades-old worries about GPAs, resumes, extracurricular activities and campus interviews, today’s college applicants must reckon with a new high-tech dilemma: Are colleges judging me based on my online activities? With top schools closely guarding the reasoning behind admissions decisions, many high schoolers are now assuming the worst and implementing online safeguards that would have never occurred to teenagers five years ago, when Facebook was just a private network and Google was still a noun.

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It turns out students have good reason to worry. According to a recent Kaplan Test Prep survey of 350 admissions officers, more than 25 percent of school officials said they had looked up applicants on Facebook or Google. Off campus, a similar percentage of private scholarship organizations also acknowledge researching their applicants online, according to a National Scholarship Providers Association survey. Still, many admissions directors are reluctant to provide specifics in how they scour social feeds. No, many say, they don’t look up every applicant online, but yes, if they somehow come across an inappropriate tweet or Facebook post, it could factor into their decision. No, they’d never use it as the deciding factor between two similar applicants, but yes, students should be mindful of what they post.

Such ambiguity has sparked an array of conspiracy theories. Bogan speculates that colleges use the emails they gather on campus tours to later find students online, even if they’ve changed their names to cover their tracks. Other students openly claim that schools are colluding with Facebook to gain full access to applicants’ restricted online profiles. Meanwhile, some students worry that going dark on Facebook will make them seem anti-social,when colleges are actually looking for outgoing applicants.

Numerous students interviewed by TIME ultimately opted for a full social media lockdown, ahead of submitting their applications. Abigail Swift, a senior at BASIS Scottsdale in Arizona, deleted her Facebook account at the start of her junior year, just as she was beginning her college search. She says she plans to revive it in 2013, after being accepted to a university. “I don’t want what I put on my Facebook or what I don’t put on my Facebook to sway their opinion of me,” she says. “I just don’t think it’s fair for them to base acceptance on that.” Many of her classmates agree, and have already restricted privacy settings so that their names don’t appear in a public Facebook search. One student went so far as to delete photos taken during 8th grade that didn’t reflect the image she is now trying to convey to schools. As young as 16, some students are already making an effort to wipe the digital slate clean. Just in case.

Almost every student has heard a horror story. At the start of the school year, a BASIS college counselor told her class of a student whose acceptance to an elite college was revoked when he was caught badmouthing the school on Facebook. At Williams College, a student’s admission was rescinded because he posted disparaging remarks on a college discussion board. At the University of Georgia, when an admissions officer discovered an applicant’s racially charged Twitter account, he took a screenshot and added the tweets to the student’s application file. Though these are extreme examples, it’s difficult to pinpoint when a teenager’s social media habits shift from innocuous to alarming in the eyes of admissions officers. Anna Redmond, a 30-year-old former interviewer for Harvard University who blogs about college admissions, says she began regularly googling prospective students years ago (interviews with alumni are a minor component of Harvard’s admissions criteria). “You could sometimes find old blog posts where they were complaining,” she says. “Maybe there was a photo of a kid drinking a beer. I don’t think it’s personally that damning, but somebody else might.”

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With the Kaplan survey showing that only 15 percent of colleges abide by a strict social media policy when it comes to applicants,such vetting is often at the discretion of individual officials. College officials point out that time restraints would make it nearly impossible to analyze every applicant through social media. However, some admit to exploring applicants’ social media timelines to make a “high stakes” decision, like awarding a prestigious scholarship, says Nora Barnes, a marketing professor at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth who has interviewed hundreds of schools about their social media practices. She says the actual number of schools doing online sleuthing could be higher than statistics show, with some wary of being viewed as invasive if they own up to the practice. “It’s a touchy subject in academia,” Barnes says. “It’s common knowledge that employers do it, and people seem to accept that.  But somehow higher ed is held to a higher standard.”

Nancy McDuff, associate vice president for admissions and enrollment management at the University of Georgia, says an applicant’s online profile is fair game to be evaluated. “If a student mentions something in their application that isn’t well explained, and you’re looking for more information, you may check their Facebook,” she says. “They’re writing about themselves. That’s no different from what a guidance counselor may write about them when they ask for someone to write a letter of recommendation.” But other admissions directors say including an inconsistent variable like Facebook profiles into the regimented application process can be unfair to students. “We like to get the same information from every candidate,” says Christoph Guttentag, the dean of undergraduate admissions at Duke University. “What one might find [on Facebook] would be close to random. There’s no guarantee that we would be getting the same kind of information between two applicants.”

For students who choose to change their Facebook names to ensure privacy, there can be consequences for violating the company’s official terms of use. About eight percent of the network’s 1 billion accounts are fakes or duplicates, according to summer filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Facebook can ban such users permanently when caught, and the company encourages users to report fake accounts. Some colleges might also view such tactics as unethical: “If a student changes their name on Facebook because they want to hide something, you just wonder whether they want to be at an institution that values an Honor Code,” McDuff says. Back at Hastings High School, students don’t view their actions as unethical. “One way a lot of people in my class coped with the stressful college application process was by being a little bit cynical about it,” Bogan says. “This is just a part of that. It’s kind of a coping mechanism.”

While some students rebel, others adapt. Among many high schoolers, there is a grudging acceptance that these are the new rules of engagement in the 21st-century admissions game. “Maybe it is a little unfair, but at the same time you’re being judged on what you have created for yourself in the past four years of your high school experience,” says Maxton Thoman, a freshman at the University of Alabama. “All that stuff is cumulative, and so is Facebook.” Thoman, who boosted his privacy settings and untagged photos of himself during the college admissions process, continues to keep a close eye on his digital profile at college. He knows that medical schools and later employers may one day be interested in what he’s posted online, so he considers his status updates before spouting off. He and many of his peers, rejecting the culture of oversharing, seem to understand intuitively a fact that has taken some adults years to grasp: “The Internet is written in ink, not in pencil.”

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33 comments
Bcroke
Bcroke

Unfortunately all of this hype is quite misguided. If you ask any admissions professional whether they do this or know anyone else that takes the time to do this the answer is outright NO. They actually are too busy managing traditional applications to check out students online. 

HOWEVER, every once in a while if an applicant is "too good to be a true" an admissions rep. may Google a prospective student and a social networking profile might come up. According to the survey 1 in 4 officers had reported doing it ever, this is a very small percentage of counselors who have done it once or twice and is not an epidemic which deserves this kind of attention. 

The truth of the matter is that colleges desperately want to connect and engage prospective students with tools like Facebook or Twitter, not to stalk them, but to show students how great their university experience is. I work for a company who works with over 100 colleges and universities to do this, and I can tell you for a fact this is the case. 

Of course students shouldn't be idiots on what they post online though. It's called common sense, but apparently that's not so common anymore. 

ShengSun
ShengSun

post anything you want, be yourself all the time. If the headmaster or the employer would turn you down for you being yourself, it's their problems, not yours. Great people will always prefer people being themselves, no matter how provocative it would be.

Tigergirl72
Tigergirl72

I know a lot of people, including myself, use social media, especially twitter, to vent and blow off steam.  Does this mean those who have some angry posts on their pages are less likely to get into a school or get a job just because they are experiencing human emotions?  I think that's rather unfair.  I have nothing to hide, but I think its a little bit of an invasion of privacy to go onto these social media sites in order to investigate who someone really is.  

CollegeSolutions.com
CollegeSolutions.com

Students need to remember that anything on the internet stays on the internet even if you hit delete. Even if colleges never check you out on the net future employers almost always do. Better to learn how to present yourself in public early.

CollegeSolutions.com
CollegeSolutions.com

Students need to remember that anything on the internet stays on the internet even if you hit delete. Even if colleges never check you out on the net future employers almost always do. Better to learn how to present yourself in public early.

Collegesolutions.com

ShengSun
ShengSun

If I were the headmaster, I would always prefer the students who dareto post something crazy, inappropriate and not deleting them onfacebook. They have the most precious value that lacks in everyonenowadays, courage and honesty.

JeanOcelot
JeanOcelot

Who cares? Just go the in-state flagship school and save yourself from excess student debt!

SmoothEdward1
SmoothEdward1

Way too much adult authority brought to bear on kids today. I'm grateful when I was their age we pushed back against that stuff and changed institutions, in many cases for the better. Today's kids were over-parented, over-organized and over-scheduled, all in name of pleasing adults. As young adults, they are forced into compliance by implied threats to their security. Not a great training ground for people who need to challenge the many injustices in the world, is it?

morganfeldon
morganfeldon

This article just points out what is wrong with the college/university system.

When universities cram 60 students into a class with a teacher who barely speaks English, and charges $20k a year for the privilege, it's not an "institution". It's a BUSINESS and students are the CUSTOMER getting screwed.

babycheeks
babycheeks

It is noteworthy that Facebook also has become a legal issue. Insurance lawyers look for anything that might help them. I saw one injured plaintiff have a post "feeling better today and got out and walk a little. That made feel even better." beat over her head when in fact she had much pain. She simply was trying to not be a whiner and get better. They used it to make her look like a malingerer.. Most attorneys now have their client's immediately shut down all social media as part of the retainer agreement.

WilfTarquin
WilfTarquin

You need three facebook and google accounts. A scrupulously inoffensive one in your real name, a real one for your friends under ascreen name, and a junk one for throwaway use when you want anonymity. Never, ever, link these accounts, in any way, any where.

Frediano
Frediano

What a dilemma; how to maintain status as a self-subscribing, happy provider of marketing data and yet still maintain the anonymity necessary to transition to four years of unbelievably expensive Beer Pong at some resort..    As it says under the visage of Buzz Aldrin on a recent Technology Review, "You promised me colonies on Mars, and all we got was FaceBook..."

Facebook was the most exciting IPO in recent history, a tsunami of bored capital thrown at, and it is an enterprise that employes maybe 3400 people;   at it's peak, Beth Steel employed over 330,000 people.    The class of 2012 may barely have jobs, but they all have a thousand friends who also barely have jobs.   What species does this to their young?

Ai-LingLogan
Ai-LingLogan

@ShengSun I'm with you.  I decided long ago to just stop trying to keep a separate public face from a private one.  It is too hard to keep a line between the two and I am better off just being okay with what and who I am so that I don't have to be someone I am not half the time to please people I don't know.  That seemed silly, so I just set everything to' 'public' except my contact info, and keep my friends list to actual friends.  Maybe someday I will find a place for myself in the world that accepts me as I am.  I try to be a good person and to let that be what I share with the world anyway.  It doesn't mean that I will swear like a sailor on the job just because I might do that on my FB page.  I do know the difference between a social network and a professional job environment.  Most other people should too, and not look to the social network to judge the professional personality.  

The problem is that maybe people are too damn judgmental of others and maybe we should all stop feeling ashamed of who we are so that more people might realize that they aren't as alone as they might think.  I make myself vulnerable by being brave enough to put my real thoughts out there, and maybe that leads the way for others. 

coconutcoconut111
coconutcoconut111

@ShengSun Post anything you want means to post anything you want. Some people post pornographic content and sexually explicit material online. Some people read what you say and take it to heart. Remember you posted this"Post anything you want . . . no matter how provocative." Really?

I have sex my spouse, but that doesn't mean I am going to post a picture of us engaging in sexual activity online. It makes sense to want to be yourself, but some things aren't meant to be put online. And that's why you need to keep your personal life personal. I have feelings toward certain issues, but I am not going to publicize all my viewpoints because it could hurt someone else. You just need to use common sense when you post.

 Trying to accuse someone of hate is very invalid and way off when they did offer some great advice. It makes sense to keep your personal life private. Venting online about personal issues, should be done in private if you want people to take you seriously. Your online presence should be professional. If you want to get into an Ivy-league college, how about making the content you post honorable and professional.

keepjapanalive
keepjapanalive

@ShengSun The problem with posting anything you want-- instead of taking a professional approach--is that people who run a business will lose clientele because their clients do not want to think the employees they hire are perverts, racist or antisemitc. If you hire perverts, some clientle will NOT do business with you. I would not want to go anywhere and take my children knowing there is a guy who posts videos of underage girls stripping (which I've seen before) or suggestive child porn on his social networking site (unfortunately, I've seen that before). It was very suggestive even though an act never occurred. It's posts like your ShenSun that make me reinforce the need to run a check first.

If you want to be yourself then you are better off working with other perverts, racists and people who post hateful material etc. How would you run a business like that? 

Think about the girl who posted a comment about President Obama. She said got fired for using the N word on Facebook and how she mentioned that she didn't care if he got assassinated.  If you can't stay professional online, then don't apply for most positions where you are required to be professional.

Sure be yourself, see how quickly people will do business with others who post sexually explicit, racist, antisemitic or content.

coconutcoconut111
coconutcoconut111

@Tigergirl72 Unfortunately, for some it does. If you don't care about your future, then post whatever you want to. I personally believe that most people don't want to throw their future away. But that's your choice. It just depends upon how much your future means to you. 

I personally feel like saying a lot of things running through my mind, but I hold it back because I know it could affect my future. I don't think it's healthy for your emotions which, in turn, could affect your health and relationships with others. If you want to be treated like an adult, then just act like one.

coconutcoconut111
coconutcoconut111

@ShengSun Yes, ShengSun you know it all and are a supreme being who can never be challenged. In fact, anyone who dares to challenge your viewpoint will automatically be labeled "intellectually inferior" by you and deemed unacceptable by your standards and personal viewpoints.  

In essence, you MUST be right, and will make that extra effort to try to prove everyone else wrong, even if you have to try to discredit and insult everyone and anyone who gets in your way. If anyone dares to challenge the King Sheng Sun by sharing another point of view, they're instantly stereotyped in a negative way and personal attacks will follow. Somehow insulting others who challenge your viewpoint seems to ingrained in your personal psyche. That's not a healthy approach to take. I can't wait to see the new set of insults and attacks that will most likely follow.

I would assume it's hard for you to have personal relationships for a long period of time if you take that approach. God only help your future employers if you challenge them. You have a chip on your shoulder. Pride comes before the fall.

keepjapanalive
keepjapanalive

@ShengSun I saw some guy post a video of an underage girl stripping. Wow, I'd really want to hire a pervert. He'd be great to hire as a teacher in an Elementary school, huh?

JohannaPloof
JohannaPloof

@SmoothEdward1 Ahhh, but you forget that the government doesn't want people to ask questions & challenge. They want drones who will bend to their will.... So, it's great training for the HIVE!

ShengSun
ShengSun

@coconutcoconut111 @ShengSun  Thank you for your advice. I have some points I want to address. 1. How can we ask 18 or 17 years old to be professional? 2. What was in your mind all the time when you were at that age? 3. We have been putting on too much sad obligations on kids nowadays, look at them, they don't look like kids anymore. 4. I didn't mean to insult anyone, I just tried to build a connection to understand his points better. 5. When I said provocative, I didn't mean anything racial or sexual, so if anyone would easily relate provocative with these issues, I could just say they are sensitive with these issues for some reasons. 6. You can behave online professional, but everybody else would make his or her own choice, we are not living in a totalitarian internet, and people have the choice to behave unprofessional as they want. 7. For those people who could take responsibility for anything they post online, and not deleting them, I would appreciate their courage and honesty.  8. Thank you for sharing your points. 

ShengSun
ShengSun

@keepjapanalive @ShengSun1.As you said, the guy who posted child porn, what he actually did was a crime. And the police should take care of that. 2. I didn't say anything about all the points you have listed, I don't know why you are so sensitive about these issues, perhaps you have the struggle in you. 3. People, no matter in what age, will have very extremely negative emotions sometimes, that doesn't mean the emotion they had when they were posting anything extreme would suggest they are extreme people under regular emotions. (I think you would understand what I am saying if you are a human being). 4.I suppose the reason you are so sensitive about all those negative facts is just because you have too much hate in you, and please take care.

ShengSun
ShengSun

@coconutcoconut111 @ShengSun I would like to be challenged, but in a better way. Mention something like 'I saw someone.....' didn't make a strong evidence to me. So I didn't consider it as a strong argument. I am wrong at a lot of times, but I am not afraid of making a stand. In my mind, listing extreme cases is the worst way to make arguments. Hitler was elected in a democratic way, but we could say democracy is evil. I would like my logic to be challenged, but to be challenged in a proper way, showing me your logic and letting me how wrong my logic is, do it please if you can. You can try to get into my mind as you were trying, but very unfortunately, you were not trying hard enough. :D

ShengSun
ShengSun

@keepjapanalive @ShengSun 1: Are you a man? 2: You are using hypothetical case to challenge my argument. To make it strong, please show me the evidence. 3. You can twist my point by listing extreme cases, but that wouldn't change any bit of this single fact.

ShengSun
ShengSun

@coconutcoconut111 @ShengSun And sorry if I sounded rude and arrogant to you before, because at the beginning I didn't know you were a mother and I thought you just wanted to humiliate me.

coconutcoconut111
coconutcoconut111

@ShengSun I have a much better suggestion if you even have the audacity to try to tell me that provocative doesn't mean arousing sexual desire or interest. Do this:

Why don't you go all the parents you know who have teenage or adult daughters. Ask their fathers if they would post as many provocative pictures of their daughters and wives as possible on Facebook and see what happens. (Then tell them you're kidding about five minutes later, because I don't want them to do that.) Or better yet, just use some excuse that provocative wasn't used in a sexual context and see what happens.

Then come back and tell me that it doesn't mean arousing sexual desire or interest. Just go to any college professor or teacher and ask them if they have any provocative pictures of their spouses to post on Facebook and see what happens. You couldn't be this naive! I think you know better. It's used in a sexual context. If you have any doubt talk to enough people. Ask photographers in the adult industry what it means. I am sure they ask for plenty of provocative pictures of the models before they consider who to use in a shoot. I am astonished that you had no idea that it means arousing a sexual desire. It does, and you will come across as a sexually-charged individual to most anyone who really does understand that word, especially if you tell them to post anything you want, even if it's provocative. Just tell that to your local pastor and watch his face drop. Some people have no idea what they are doing. I'd suggest before you get online and tell teenagers to post provocative content, to have someone who is intelligent go over what you want to post first. Sometimes your worst enemy is yourself.

coconutcoconut111
coconutcoconut111

@ShengSun @coconutcoconut111 I found a better definition of provocative:

It means: Arousing sexual desire or interest, esp. deliberately.

It's funny that you are acting as if you don't know what provocative means. It means AROUSING SEXUAL DESIRE OR INTEREST DELIBERATELY. When you say "post whatever you want . . . no matter how provocative," you may as well be saying : Post anything that arouses a sexual desire. What did you think provocative meant? When you use that word that's what people will automatically think because that's what it means. It sexual in context. Even if that definition has more than one meaning most people will think it's sexual in nature, regardless of what was going on in your mind. You can't say "Oh, no that's not what I meant" because that's what the word means. Since that's what the word means, you can automatically be branded as someone who suggests to post anything you want that arouses a sexual desire or interest in a deliberate fashion.

coconutcoconut111
coconutcoconut111

@ShengSun @coconutcoconut111 Posting pictures of myself in a sexually provocative manner was not in my mind at that age. In fact I never wanted to post sexually provocative pictures of myself, ever! But I did have friends who were in Playboy (at age 18) and who got around, but that wasn't on my mind. Back then they had wet tee shirt contests. You could be underage too. Drinking age was only 18-19. Plenty of teenage girls did that. I didn't! That wasn't on my mind!

http://on.aol.com/video/teen-stunts-landing-kids-on-sex-offender-list-for-life-517523819

 They talk about kids who posted sexually provocative pictures and now are registered sex offenders in that video above. You should look up the definition of PROVOCATIVE.  Do you know what it means?

 It means: acting as a stimulus or incitement, esp to anger or sexual desire;

Essentially, you're talking about posting whatever you want, esp. to anger others or anything that arouses a sexual desire in others. That's what provocative means. You are telling others to post content that is sexual in nature - anything you want. What do you think it meant? Whatever you thought, I have no time to explain any longer. I have to take care of things for Thanskgiving. Take care. I wish you the best.

ShengSun
ShengSun

@coconutcoconut111 @ShengSun

Hello, sensitive lady. I apologize for the senseless offense you have got from my post. And thank you for your so much amount of time and energy you have put in the conversation. I believe we understand 'provocative' in a different way, and that is why we could not have a constructive conversation. And I think you are right about some points that people are so sensitive about sexual issues that anything thing that could be related to that would be misinterpreted very easily.

So please let me clear my point here so you could understand my point better. When I posted my comment, I didn't think about sexual issues especially. What I understand provocative is being provocative in a general way. But as you would like to understand provocative in a sexual way, I would like to use another word here, 'challenging'. I can understand your point being a mother partly. So I can see why you are sensitive about sexual issues, again sorry for the senseless offense.

About the point I really would like to make there, I meant I would like the internet to be more tolerant to kids nowadays when they grow up. Kids are always rebels no matter we want them to be or not. If they are not even allowed to release their emotions on internet when they are pissed off or stressed out, they would do things much worse as you can imagine.

The world has been putting on so much pressure and so many obligations on kids nowadays that when they rebel, they rebel in those extreme ways we don't want to see. We think it's kids' problem, but very unfortunately, we are the ones who are responsible for this environment we have created for them. To let the kids release their rebellion on internet is better than to let them do it elsewhere. And we need them to be rebels in a positive way so we need to build an environment more tolerant for them. Not allowing them to do things would only make things worse.

I didn't mean to offend anyone, but I did want to provoke some people.

I hope I have made my point clear enough, if you can see my point in a general way, please do it.

coconutcoconut111
coconutcoconut111

@ShengSun Why are you looking for a challenge? Why aren't you exploring the truth? Do you have a hard time understanding what provocative means?

Provocative - http://www.yourdictionary.com/provocative

Unless you are mentally challenged, that link will provide you with the definition of provocative.

Provocative - something exciting, stimulating or erotic. A burlesque dancer at a nightclub is an example of provocative.

Something like understanding the words you use in a sentence shouldn't be a challenge.

coconutcoconut111
coconutcoconut111

@ShengSun @coconutcoconut111 You said: "POST ANYTHING YOU WANT  . . NO MATTER HOW PROVOCATIVE." 

What you consider extreme may not be extreme in someone else's mind. The legal age of concent in some countries is much lower than in the US. For example. in Spain I believe it's 13.

You said POST WHATEVER YOU WANT. Some of the kids did that and it got them in a lot of trouble (see links below). I could go on and on. I even remember an article of a 14-year-old girl, who posted a topless picture of herself on Facebook and because of it, she now has a record and is a registered sex offender. I am sorry, I don't have all day to list anymore links or examples. I don't have the time. You are very draining in your approach. You need some sort of proof beyond a reasonable doubt when considering your very suggestive statement:"POST WHATEVER YOU WANT  . . . NO MATTER HOW PROVOCATIVE."

 If you feel the need to tell teenagers to" POST ANYTHING THEY WANT" and let them know it doesn't matter "how provocative it is," then that's your choice. It makes me wonder why you would want to do that. As a woman, usually it was the perverts and the people in the sex industry who would suggest something like that when I had a social networking site. They would try to solicit me in to the sex industry. I was pretty shaken by it because I had nothing on my site that suggested I ready for that kind of lifestyle. So when I hear someone saying POST ANYTHING YOU WANT, matter how provocative. it sounds weird. I am sure you are not a sex offender or involved in the sex industry, but it does sound suspicious. 

Think about it. If you had a teenage daughter and her friend started tell her to POST WHATEVER YOU WANT. Don't worry it can be as provocative as you want. What would you think? It just sounds weird.

I am leaving town due to the holidays. Take care. I have nothing more to talk about on here with you. You are draining and I have no time for you. I will just leave you with the facts:

22% of teenage girls say they posted nude or semi-nude photos or videos of themselves online. ( http://www.guardchild.com/statistics/) 22 percent is more than just one or two extreme cases. I wonder how many more were done without their knowledge or against their will?

 http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/teen-angst/201103/sexting-teens

http://sexoffenderresearch.blogspot.com/2011/01/teen-girl-charged-with-posting-nude.html

http://mobilemediaguard.com/state_main.htmlhttp://digitallife.today.com/_news/2012/04/06/11059777-teenage-boy-brags-about-facebook-porn-arrest-on-twitter?lite

http://techcrunch.com/2009/08/10/survey-13-percent-of-teens-have-posted-nude-photos-of-themselves-online/

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